Your Happiness Factor

Your Happiness Factor:celebrating happiness, prosperity, hearth and home, good health.

Wednesday, 16 February 2011

Congratulations, you have been invited for an interview – now what?

Being in a job you don’t like is a major cause of unhappiness.  Having no job at all can cause a huge amount of misery.  So when you do get the opportunity to go for an interview, you want to do your best.  Don’t lose out because you did not do your home work!  Here are some tips from the Business Balls Website to help you on the way! 


1.        Research as much as you can about the company – products, services, markets, competitors, trends, current activities, priorities.


2.       Prepare your answers for the type of questions you’ll be asked, especially, be able to say why you want the job, what your strengths are, how you’d do the job, what your best achievements are.
3.       Prepare good questions to ask at the interview ask about the job priorities and scope, the organisation and think of ways to make a difference or an improvement
4.       Related to the above, request a copy of the company’s employment terms and conditions or employee handbook before the interview, in order to save time covering routine matters during the interview.
5.        Assemble hard evidence (make sure it’s clear and concise) of how what you’ve achieved in the past – proof will put you ahead of those who merely talk about it.
6.       If possible. have at least one other interview lined up, or have a recent job offer, or the possibility of receiving one from a recent job interview, and make sure you mention it to the interviewer.
7.        Make sure your resume/cv is up to date, looking very good and even if already supplied to the interviewer take three with you (one for the interviewer, one for you and a spare in case the interviewer brings a colleague in to the meeting).
8.       Get hold of the following material and read it, and remember the relevant issues, and ask questions about the areas that relate to the organisation and the role. Obtain and research: the company’s sales brochures and literature, a trade magazine covering the company’s market sector, and a serious newspaper for the few days before the interview so you’re informed about world and national news. Also worth getting hold of: company ‘in-house’ magazines or newsletters, competitor leaflets, local or national newspaper articles featuring the company.
9.       Review your personal goals and be able to speak openly and honestly about them and how you plan to achieve them.
10.     Ensure you have two or three really good reputable and relevant references, and check they’d each be happy to be contacted.
11.      Adopt an enthusiastic, alert, positive mind-set. 
12.     Particularly think about how to deal positively with any negative aspects – especially from the perspective of telling the truth, instead of evading or distorting facts, which rarely succeeds.
13.     Try to get some experience of personality tests. Discover your personality strengths and weaknesses that would be indicated by a test, and be able to answer questions positively about the results. (Do not be intimidated by personality testing – expose yourself to it and learn about yourself)   
14.     Think about what to wear.  Do you know the company dress code? When in doubt wear a smart business suit!
15.     Some jobs invite or offer opportunity to re-define or develop the role itself. It might be a existing role or a new position. If so prepare for this. Most jobs in fact offer this potential, but sometimes it is a stated requirement.




236419442_80_808Wendy Mason is a Career Coach and Life Coach helping you to solve difficult problems at work
wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com 
http://wisewolfcoaching.com

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